CAL’s new Saab christened into fleet

| 16/11/2015 | 9 Comments
CNS Business

The ribbon cutting at the christening of CAL’s new Saab aircraft

(CNS Business): Cayman Airways’ new Saab 340B+ aircraft was formally christened on Friday 13 November at the Charles Kirkconnell International Airport (CKIA) on Cayman Brac. The airline said that the 34-seat aircraft will be phased into service between Grand Cayman and the Brac this month, replacing the 30-seat Embraer E120, which has operated under a temporary wet-lease. CAL has not revealed the cost of the plane but in August officials said the airline expected to have paid for it within six months.

“After a thorough evaluation, the Saab 340B+ aircraft was selected as an ideal aircraft to provide the necessary capacity and frequency for service between Grand Cayman and Cayman Brac,” said President and CEO of CAL, Fabian Whorms, who noted that the plane had low operating costs and fuel-efficient engines. “Despite some logistical challenges along the way, we are excited to celebrate the entry of the Saab aircraft into service and look forward to delivering that Caymankind service as only Cayman Airways can.”

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The Cayman Islands Fire Service on Cayman Brac gives the new plane a water cannon salute

Deputy Premier and Minister of District Administration, Tourism, and Transport, Moses Kirkconnell, said finding the right aircraft for Cayman Brac had been a long road.

“The start of service by the Saab 340B+ heralds a great improvement in the quality of service for travelers between Cayman Brac and Grand Cayman. The 20% plus growth in Cayman Brac passengers experienced with the temporary lease of the Embraer is testament to the potential that right-sized air service can provide,” he said, adding that he anticipated “truly great things for the Sister Islands in the days and months ahead”.

Following a special water cannon salute by the Cayman Islands Fire Service after the plane landed, a special christening ceremony was held at CKIA with government officials, industry partners, Cayman Airways employees and members of the Cayman Brac community. Entertainment was provided by the steel pan band of the Layman E. Scott High School, and the primary schools’ Combined School Choir.

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Category: Local Business, Stay-over tourism, Tourism

Comments (9)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    And Declares a Full Emergency on Sat 28th

  2. Anonymous says:

    I just hope this is in better condition than the Embraer – that thing is a wreck.

  3. Bluff Patrol says:

    If only our government was less excited about ribbon cutting and photo ops and more excited about revenue generation.

    CIG/CAL (i.e. the public purse) has been making payments on this plane and related its expenses for months now and for much of that time its been sitting in a hangar.

    Pardon me if I delay my excitement until when it starts making money…

  4. Soldier Crab says:

    ‘Christening’ implies giving a name.
    That didn’t happen so whatever this ceremony was, it was not a ‘christening’.

    The ignorance and rudeness of the security staff at the Brac airport makes you wish you didn’t have to fly. You don’t have to go through all of this to take a bus to East End: wake up the Brac is part of the Cayman Islands.

  5. Shirley Smart says:

    The Embraer had 30 seats. I’m not too smart, so will someone tell me why a plane with 34 seats needs 21 more workers to make the same flight?? It doesn’t sound very economical to me.

    • Anonymous says:

      Bracomathics of course.
      Run it on your KirkBot and you will see it makes good business sense.

  6. Anonymous says:

    So we spend an undisclosed amount of money on a wore out aircraft and create 21 more unneeded jobs to be funded from the public purse and we are boasting about improvement in the Cayman Brac economy.

    Kirkconnomics!!!

  7. Anonymous says:

    New Saab?
    Production shut down
    In 1998 as no one wanted them.

  8. Anonymous says:

    Yaawwnnn!

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